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Anwesend - Lethargic Man (anag.)

Lethargic Man (anag.)
Date: 2017-06-02 03:29
Subject: Anwesend
Security: Public
Tags:linguistics geekery
"What's the opposite of abwesend?" asks my teacher. To me, it's so obviously paralleling "absent" that the only thing I can think of is "adwesend".

(This is likely to leave anyone who doesn't know both Latin and German scratching their heads...)

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curious_reader: Mountain Lion Cub
User: curious_reader
Date: 2017-06-02 19:14 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Mountain Lion Cub
Well, you can reinvent German and write a new dictionary if you like but don't expect anybody to understand you. My grandmother had a German-Persian dictionary where the man who wrote it did not appear to understand German. He just used random pre-fixes and mistranslated words. My grandmother told me when it was wrong as she understands and speaks both. The words you are looking for is "anwesend". I am not sure if you know the Hungarian dictionary joke by Monty Python. It is on youtube.

Edited at 2017-06-02 07:15 pm (UTC)
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Lethargic Man (anag.)
User: lethargic_man
Date: 2017-06-03 20:39 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
The words you are looking for is "anwesend".

I'm aware of this; it's in the subject line of my posting!
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curious_reader: tiger cub
User: curious_reader
Date: 2017-06-04 01:59 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:tiger cub
I hope you are also aware that you just invented a new pre-fix that never existed in German.
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Lethargic Man (anag.)
User: lethargic_man
Date: 2017-06-04 07:14 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I didn't invent anything; it's Latin. In Latin the opposite of ab- is ad-. -wesend is obviously from sein, and English "absent" from Latin ab- plus the verb in Latin for "to be". This is how I memorised abwesend in the first place. Hence when I had to think of the opposite, my brain got confused as to languages and went into Latin mode.
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