February 2nd, 2014

(relatively) recent

My body's reaction to a sedentary occupation

I like my job, but a problem with it (and with sitting reading on a Shabbos afternoon too) is that it only keeps my mind occupied, not my body. My body responds by clamouring for attention: I find myself getting hungry sooner, and more often, than when I'm doing something that involves more than just sitting on my tochus; bad habits like biting my nails also come to the fore.

Does anyone else find this, or is it just me?

—Originally posted on Dreamwidth, where there are comment count unavailable comments. Please comment there using OpenID or a DreamWidth account (which you no longer need an invite code to create). Though I am leaving comments enabled on LiveJournal for a bit, please don't comment here if you can do so there instead.
reflect

Atheism: Is it good for the Jews?

When I was young, it seemed to me I was living in a Christian country, for all that much of the populace wasn't particularly religious; in some ways the default assumptions that went with this seemed prejudicial to Jews such as myself, and I thought to myself how better it would be were the country not so Christian.

Well, you should be careful what you wish for. The country is now decidedly less Christian than when I grew up: the government has made various rulings contrary to at least traditional Christian values, but this hasn't worked out in the Jews' favour at all; a large swathe of the population—certainly the ones who write comments on any news article online—are now decidedly anti-religious, an observation of mine confirmed in this article, and I feel that certain religious practices—I am, of course, thinking primarily about shechita and circumcision—in this country are, if not under threat now, may possibly become so in the future. For all that the online commenters rant about the bad religion has led to, the intolerance they show to practices that don't exactly match their worldview doesn't exactly cast them in a good light either.

The only comfort to be drawn in this situation is that the government has always ignored such pedagogical sentiments (otherwise, to take one well-known example, we'd have never got rid of the death penalty).

—Originally posted on Dreamwidth, where there are comment count unavailable comments. Please comment there using OpenID or a DreamWidth account (which you no longer need an invite code to create). Though I am leaving comments enabled on LiveJournal for a bit, please don't comment here if you can do so there instead.
(relatively) recent

Requested posts

I've been seeing some excellent posts on requested topics on friends' blogs recently (principally [personal profile] liv, but also others). Are there any subjects I don't normally post about that anyone would like me to pontificate on?

—Originally posted on Dreamwidth, where there are comment count unavailable comments. Please comment there using OpenID or a DreamWidth account (which you no longer need an invite code to create). Though I am leaving comments enabled on LiveJournal for a bit, please don't comment here if you can do so there instead.
reflect

Revolutionary Judaism

For eighteen hundred years, Jews lived by a precedent-based legal system called halacha. Then the Reform movement came along and declared that halacha was no longer binding. Reform Judaism? We should call it Revolutionary Judaism!

Discuss. [20 marks]

—Originally posted on Dreamwidth, where there are comment count unavailable comments. Please comment there using OpenID or a DreamWidth account (which you no longer need an invite code to create). Though I am leaving comments enabled on LiveJournal for a bit, please don't comment here if you can do so there instead.